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Two Top Economists to Analyze U.S. Economy in UI Appearances This Month

Paul Krugman and Roger Ferguson, two of the nation's most prominent economists, will offer their analysis of the perilous state of the U.S. economy and how it might be returned to firmer footing in appearances at The University of Iowa this month.

Ferguson, president and CEO of TIAA-CREF, will speak at UI's Tippie College of Business on Wednesday, March 25, at 11 a.m. in the Senate Chambers of Old Capitol. Krugman, Nobel Laureate for Economics and an economics columnist for the New York Times, will deliver the College of Law's annual Levitt Lecture on Friday, March 27 at 4 p.m. in MacBride Auditorium. Both lectures are free and open to the public. Ferguson's lecture is titled "The Economic Outlook and Its Implications for Higher Education." Krugman's lecture is titled "Improving the U.S. Economy in the Short and Long Term."

Ferguson has led the mutual fund and annuity company that specializes in providing services for higher education, medical, and cultural organization employees since April. In that time, he has worked to guide the company through market collapses, economic struggles, and a credit crunch not seen since the Great Depression. Before that, Ferguson was a governor of the Federal Reserve System from 1997 to 2006, serving as vice chairman from 1999. He was also a voting member of the Federal Open Market Committee.

Krugman won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2008 for his work on international trade and economic geography, which studies the economic dynamics that determine how and why certain places—like Silicon Valley—end up specializing economically. Also a professor of economics at Princeton University, Krugman has written a twice-weekly op-ed column about economics for the New York Times since 1999. He has written more than 200 papers and 20 books. Among his best-sellers are The Conscience of a Liberal, The Great Unraveling: Losing Our Way in the New Century, and The Accidental Theorist and other Dispatches from the Dismal Science.


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