News & Events

Schmidt Earns Top Human Resources Honor

Frank Schmidt, the Ralph L. Sheets Professor of Management and Organizations in the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, has won the Michael R. Losey Human Resource Research Award, one of the top research awards in the human resource field. This award was established to honor Michael R. Losey, retired Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) president and CEO, for his contributions to SHRM, as well as to the field of Human Resource Management(HR).

The award originated in 2002 and Schmidt is the third recipient. Along with the honor comes a $50,000 prize, and Schmidt plans to donate $10,000 of the award to the Department of Management and Organizations in the Tippie College.

The Losey Award recognizes experts who have made outstanding research contributions to the HR field and who will use the money associated with the award to continue to contribute to HR research. Schmidt will accept the award at the 2005 SHRM Annual Conference in San Diego in June.

A group of Schmidt's fellow professors from the UI Department of Management and Organizations nominated him for the award. According to nominators Sara Rynes, Murray Barrick, Amy Kristof-Brown, and Michael Mount, "He has made major contributions to fundamental issues at the heart of HR for over 35 years and continues to do so."

The group said Schmidt's first major contribution to the HR field is the development and application of validity generalization, which uses data analysis methods to test whether conflicting HR research findings are real or simply the result of statistical and measurement artifacts.

Over the years, hundreds of such studies have been conducted, changing the way HR professionals think about selection methods. This has led to changes in employment selection practices in many industries, corporations and government agencies. Through validity generalization, Schmidt and his colleague John Hunter of Michigan State University have shown that, no matter what the job, general intelligence is the single best predictor of both performance and occupational level attained.

Schmidt's second major contribution to the HR field is his development of meta-analytic methods, which clarify and reveal the meaning of seemingly conflicting research literatures. These methods have been applied to most major HR research areas. Examples include the relationship between measures of employee attitudes and financial outcomes, as well as a variety of relationships such as employee job satisfaction and job performance, determinants of organizational citizenship behavior, and the relationship between work-family conflict and job satisfaction.

During his career, Schmidt has received the highest research awards given by the American Psychological Association, the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology, and the HR Division of the Academy of Management. Schmidt currently serves as the department executive officer for the Department of Management and Organizations within Iowa's Tippie College of Business.


Return to top of page