Marketing has reinvented itself in the digital age.

So long, Don Draper.

Technology has made marketing into a true combination of art and science. Marketers are nimble and can pivot on a dime.

Not sure which design is best for an online campaign? Try them both, and adjust your strategy instantly as the data rolls in. Data and analytics can plug information gaps that used to take major effort to fill.

The expansion of the discipline has expanded marketing jobs far beyond what they used to be. Here's a short list of what our recent marketing grads have been up to:

  • Merchandising at Lowes
  • Product management at Hewlett Packard
  • Brand management at Hershey’s
  • Market research and analytics at LogMeIn
  • Management consulting at Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Market research at Ipsos
  • Marketing analytics at Pella
  • New business development at Microsoft

 

Alumni Story
At Tippie, Tara From (MBA11) led marketing for a consulting team to help a Chicago nonprofit get GPS-enabled cell phones to blind and visually impaired children in Illinois

Pivot from nonprofit to one of the world's largest airlines

Tara From (MBA11) leveraged an internship with Continental Airlines for a spot on United Airlines Emerging Leaders rotational program. For her first rotation, she led the post-merger communications plan for marketing in-flight operations.

For her second rotation, she worked with the loyalty group and merchandising team. After the program, she joined the media team selling United’s advertising space to third-parties, and most recently, rejoined the loyalty redemption team in a senior manager capacity in non-air redemption miles.

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Make your career what you want it to be

The broadening of marketing is a pretty great opportunity for you to shape your career as you see fit. If you know what you like to do and what you're good at, there's a marketing career out there for you. Some of the more common areas include:

Market strategists & researchers

Part math geeks, part culture mavens, these are the specialists that combine data and consumer culture to figure out what the customer wants. They pass this insight along to the people developing the products and communicating with customers.

Example roles: Market strategist, market planner, market researcher, market segmentation specialist

Product & brand managers

These folks are the "CEOs" of a product or category, and work with engineers, retailers, designers, trend analysts—even taste-testers—to get the best possible version of their product on the shelf and in front of customers. 

Example roles: Product/brand manager, new product development manager, strategic pricing manager, category manager

Marketing communication

It's all about messaging. These marketers are a direct line of communication to customers. They understand what motivates them, and they use words and visuals to speak directly to those motivations. They strive for the right mix of medium, messaging, and creative to cut through the clutter and get their product front and center.

Example roles: Advertising, public relations, digital marketer, social media marketer, merchandising