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Rynes Earns Career Award from Academy of Management's Human Resources Division

Sara Rynes, the John F. Murray Professor of Management and Organizations at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, has earned one of the top academic awards in the field of human resource management. Rynes will receive the 2006 Herbert Heneman Jr. Award for Career Achievement from the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management.

The award will be presented to Rynes at the Academy's annual meeting, August 11-16 in Atlanta.

Frank Schmidt, Ralph L. Sheets Professor of Management and Organizations and Department of Management and Organizations executive officer, said this is the top award given for research in human resources by the Academy's Human Resources Division. The Heneman award is given annually to people who have distinguished themselves throughout their careers in the field of human resource management. Specifically, Rynes was recognized for her clear record of research excellence; for research that has impacted the science, teaching and practice of human resource management; and for her stature in the field.

Founded in 1936, the Academy is the leading professional association for scholars dedicated to creating and disseminating knowledge about management and organizations.

Professor Rynes received a Ph.D. in industrial relations, M.S. in industrial relations, and a B.A. in social work from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on job search and recruitment, compensation strategies and outcomes, human resource strategies, and knowledge transfer between academia and practitioners. She is also editor of the Academy of Management Journal, and a Fellow of the Academy of Management, the American Psychological Association, and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

Her study, "Corporate Social and Financial Performance: A Meta-analysis" (co-authored with Schmidt and Mark Orlitzky of the University of Auckland) was the winner of 2004 Moskowitz Prize for the strongest quantitative study relevant to the field of social investment.


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